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Proceeds from What's Up with White Women? Unpacking Sexism and White Privilege in Pursuit of Racial Justice benefit Tsuru for Solidarity and The Unspoken Truths. As two white women, the authors feel earnings from book sales should benefit POC-led organizations. Please join us in supporting their important work!

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PROCEEDS TO DATE: $1,100
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The Unspoken Truths

Delbert Richardson is the Founder and Curator of the National Award winning American History Traveling Museum: The Unspoken Truths. The Museum chronicles the rich history of Africans in Africa prior to American Chattel Slavery, the experiences and impact of American Chattel Slavery and of the Jim Crow Era, while also detailing the many contributions African Americans have had on scientific, cultural, and technological inventions/innovations in the U.S., and the world.

The Museum’s mission is to re-educate learners of all ages, in a manner that leads to self- restoration and community healing, with the eventual goal of implementing its teachings into school curricula, institutions, and organizations committed to cultural competence and social justice.

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Tsuru for Solidarity

 

Tsuru for Solidarity is a nonviolent, direct action project of Japanese American social justice advocates and allies working to end detention sites and support directly impacted immigrant and refugee communities that are being targeted by racist, inhumane immigration policies. We stand on the moral authority of Japanese Americans who suffered the atrocities and legacy of U.S. concentration camps during WWII and we say, “Stop Repeating History!” 

Never Again is NOW.

Our mission is to:

  • educate, advocate, and protest to close all U.S. concentration camps; 

  • build solidarity with other communities of color that have experienced forced removal, detention, deportation, separation of families, and other forms of racial and state violence; 

  • coordinate intergenerational, cross-community healing circles addressing the trauma of our shared histories.